It’s Like This – 108 Dhamma Similes

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It't like thisAjahn Chah was a master at using the apt and unusual simile to explain points of Dhamma in a memorable way, sometimes to answer questions, sometimes to provoke them. He was especially talented at exploiting the open-ended nature of the simile—in which some similarities are relevant and others are not—using a particular image to make one point in one context, and a very different point in another. This book is a companion to In Simple Terms, an earlier collection of similes drawn from Ajahn Chah’s transcribed talks. Here, the majority of the passages come from a compilation made by Ajahn Jandee Kantasaro, one of Ajahn Chah’s students, entitled Khwaam Phid Nai Khwaam Thuuk (What’s Wrong in What’s Right). The title of this compilation is taken from a phrase that Ajahn Chah often used to describe the misuse of correct knowledge. Ajahn Jandee, in his introduction, illustrates the principle by telling of a man he once encountered who used the teaching on inconstancy to justify the fact that he never cleaned his truck.

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Parayanavagga – The Way to the Beyond

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Parayanavagga - The Way to the BeyondParayanavagga or The Way to the Beyond is a controversial part of the Pali Canon, some of the earliest known written Buddhist texts. Research indicates that Parayanavagga might even be the oldest part of the Pali Canon. The suttas is a record of conversations between the Buddha and sixteen Brahmin meditaton masters which resulted in their awakening. Parayanavagga is radical in the sense that it stresses the overall importance in non-attachment to all views and ideas, and at the same time it rejects asceticism. This is the fourth way of Theraveda Buddhism, one could be led to think, since the texts describes spiritual transformation as a process out folding in the midst of everyday life of the practitioner.

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The Way Things Really Are – Book IV of the Sutta-Nipita

The Way Things Really Are - Book IV of the Sutta-Nipita

The Way Things Really Are - Book IV of the Sutta-NipitaThe Way Things Really Are is translation of Book IV of the Sutta-Nipata by Lesley Fowler Lebkowicz, Tamara Ditrich and Primoz Pecenko.The Sutta-Nipata is one of the earliest texts of the Pali canon, coming from the same period as the Dhammapada, before the monastic tradition was strong. It was created by people as they practiced and refers to “the wise one”, rather than to monks or nuns. For several centuries after the death of the Buddha the Canon was transmitted orally, probably in several dialects, throughout the Indian subcontinent. According to the traditional sources, the entire Canon was for the first time written down in the first century BCE in Sri Lanka. Some scholars believe that the Sutta-Nipita describes the oldest of all Buddhist practices. It consists mainly of verses.

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No Inner Core – an Introduction to the Doctrine of Anatta

No inner Core Anatta

No inner Core Anatta No Inner Core – An Introduction to the Doctrine of Anatta by Sayadaw U SilanandaThe Anatta doctrine is one of the most important teachings of Buddhism. It is the most distinctive feature of Buddhism, for, as many scholars have recognized, it makes Buddhism different from all other religions. The understanding of Anatta, the theory of no-soul or non-self, is a tough nut to crack. Yet only with a correct understanding of this key Buddhist issue can the door to the profound and liberating teachings of the Buddha be opened. Knowing about the crucial importance of the doctrine of Anatta, the reader might gather his or her courage to work through Sayadaw’s scholarly introduction to this central teaching.

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The Stillness of Being

Stillness of Being

Stillness of Being The Stillness of Being by Viradhammo Bhikku was published in 2005. It consists of teachings based on talks given at different monasteries in the 1980’es. Viradhammo was born in Esslingen in Germany in 1947 and while living in India he discovered Buddhism and met his teacher Samanera Bodhesako. He later travelled to Thailand to become a novice at Wat Mahathat in 1973 and took bhikkhu ordination the following year at Wat Pah Pong with Ajahn Chah. After four years in Thailand, he went to Canada to visit his family in 1977 and he was asked by Ajahn Chah to join Ajahn Sumedho at the Hampstead Vihara in London. Later, he was involved in the establishment of both the Chithurst and Harnham monasteries in the UK. In 1985 he moved to New Zealand, where he lived for 10 years, setting up Bodhinyanarama monastery.

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